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Drugs that may cause impotence


Alternative names

Various medications and recreational drugs can have an affect on sexual arousal and sexual performance. It should be noted that what causes impotency in one man may cause an erection in another.

If you suspect that a medication you are taking is having a negative effect on sexual performance, discuss the matter with your health care provider. NEVER stop taking any medication without first consulting your health care provider because some medications can produce life-threatening reactions if they are not tapered or switched appropriately.

The following is a list of medications and non-prescription drugs that may cause impotence:

Antidepressant and other psychiatric medications:

  • Amitriptyline (Elavil)
  • Buspirone (Buspar)
  • Chlordiazepoxide (Librium)
  • Chlorpromazine (Thorazine)
  • Clorazepate (Tranxene)
  • Desipramine (Norpramin)
  • Diazepam (Valium)
  • Doxepin (Sinequan)
  • Fluoxetine (Prozac)
  • Fluphenazine (Prolixin)
  • Imipramine (Tofranil)
  • Lorazepam (Ativan)
  • Meprobamate (Equanil)
  • Mesoridazine (Serentil)
  • Nortriptyline (Pamelor)
  • Oxazepam (Serax)
  • Phenelzine (Nardil)
  • Phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • Thioridazine (Mellaril)
  • Thiothixene (Navane)
  • Tranylcypromine (Parnate)
  • Trifluoperazine (Stelazine)
Antihistamine medications:
  • Dimenhydrinate (Dramamine)
  • Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)
  • Hydroxyzine (Vistaril)
  • Meclizine (Antivert)
  • Promethazine (Phenergan)
Antihypertensive and diuretic medications:
  • Atenolol (Tenormin)
  • Bethanidine
  • Chlorothiazide (Diuril)
  • Chlorthalidone (Hygroton)
  • Clonidine (Catapres)
  • Enalapril (Vasotec)
  • Guanabenz (Wytensin)
  • Guanethidine (Ismelin)
  • Guanfacine (Tenex)
  • Haloperidol (Haldol)
  • Hydralazine (Apresoline)
  • Hydrochlorothiazide (Esidrix)
  • Labetalol (Normodyne)
  • Methyldopa (Aldomet)
  • Metoprolol (Lopressor)
  • Minoxidil (Loniten)
  • Phenoxybenzamine (Dibenzyline)
  • Phentolamine (Regitine)
  • Prazosin (Minipress)
  • Propranolol (Inderal)
  • Reserpine (Serpasil)
  • Spironolactone (Aldactone)
  • Triamterene (Maxide)
  • Verapamil (Calan)

Among the anti-hypertensive medications, thiazides are the most common cause of ED, followed by beta-blockers. Alpha-blockers are, in general, less likely to cause this problem.

Anti Parkinson's disease medications:
  • Benztropine (Cogentin)
  • Biperiden (Akineton)
  • Bromocriptine (Parlodel)
  • Levodopa (Sinemet)
  • Procyclidine (Kemadrin)
  • Trihexyphenidyl (Artane)
Chemotherapy medications:
  • Antiandrogens (Casodex, Flutamide, Nilutamide)
  • Busulfan (Myleran)
  • Cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan)
  • Ketoconazole
  • LHRH agonists (Lupron, Zoladex)

Other medications:

  • Aminocaproic acid (Amicar)
  • Atropine
  • Clofibrate (Atromid-S)
  • Cyclobenzaprine (Flexeril)
  • Cyproterone
  • Digoxin (Lanoxin)
  • Disopyramide (Norpace)
  • Estrogen
  • Finesteride (Propecia, Proscar)
  • Furazolidone (Furoxone)
  • H2 Blockers (Tegamet, Zantac, Pepcid)
  • Indomethacin (Indocin)
  • Lipid lowering-agents
  • Licorice
  • Metoclopramide (Reglan)
  • NSAIDs (Ibuprofen, etc.)
  • Orphenadrine (Norflex)
  • Prochlorperazine (Compazine)

Opiate analgesics (painkillers)

  • Morphine
  • Methadone
  • Fentanyl (Innovar)
  • Meperidine (Demerol)
  • Codeine
  • Oxycodone (Oxycontin, Percodan)
  • Hydromorphone (Dilaudid)

Recreational Drugs:

  • Alcohol
  • Amphetamines
  • Barbiturates
  • Cocaine
  • Marijuana
  • Heroin
  • Nicotine

Update Date: 7/31/2002

Young Kang, M.D., Department of Urology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network.

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Last updated: Tue, 06 Jan 2009 00:20:03 GMT
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