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Other drug names: A-Am An-Az B C-Ch Ci-Cz D-Dh Di-Dz E F G H I-J K-L M-Mh Mi-Mz N-Nh Ni-Nz O P-Pl Pm-Pz Q-R S-Sn So-Sz T-To Tp-Tz U-V W-Z 0-9   

Dipyridamole Therapeutic (Systemic)

Brand Names

In the U.S.-

  • Persantine

In Canada-

  • Apo-Dipyridamole FC
  • Apo-Dipyridamole SC
  • Novo-Dipiradol
  • Persantine

Category

  • Antithrombotic adjunct
  • myocardial reinfarction prophylactic adjunct
  • platelet aggregation inhibitor

Description

Dipyridamole ( dye-peer-ID-a-mole) is used to lessen the chance of stroke or other serious medical problems that may occur when a blood vessel is blocked by blood clots. It is given only when there is a larger-than-usual chance that these problems may occur. For example, it is given to people who have had diseased heart valves replaced by mechanical valves, because dangerous blood clots are especially likely to occur in these patients. Dipyridamole works by helping to prevent dangerous blood clots from forming.

Dipyridamole may also be used for other heart and blood conditions as determined by your doctor.

Dipyridamole is also sometimes used as part of a medical test that shows how well blood is flowing to your heart. For information on this use of dipyridamole, see Dipyridamole-Diagnostic (Systemic).

Dipyridamole is available only with your doctor's prescription, in the following dosage forms:

    Oral
  • Tablets (U.S. and Canada)
    Parenteral
  • Injection (U.S. and Canada)



Before Using This Medicine

In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For dipyridamole, the following should be considered:

Allergies- Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to dipyridamole. Also tell your health care professional if you are allergic to any other substances, such as foods, preservatives, or dyes.

Pregnancy- Although studies have not been done in pregnant women, dipyridamole has not been reported to cause birth defects or other problems in humans. However, studies in animals have shown that dipyridamole decreased the number of successful pregnancies in female rats given many times the maximum human dose.

Breast-feeding- Although dipyridamole passes into breast milk, it has not been reported to cause problems in nursing babies.

Children- This medicine has been tested only in adults and in children older than 12 years of age. There is no specific information comparing use of dipyridamole in children younger than 12 years of age with use in other age groups.

Older adults- Dipyridamole has not been studied specifically in older people taking the medicine regularly to prevent blood clots from forming. Although there is no specific information comparing this use of dipyridamole in the elderly with use in other age groups, it is not expected to cause different side effects or problems in older people than it does in younger adults.

Other medicines- Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking dipyridamole, it is especially important that your health care professional know if you are taking any of the following:

  • Aspirin or
  • Carbenicillin by injection (e.g., Geopen) or
  • Cefamandole (e.g., Mandol) or
  • Cefoperazone (e.g., Cefobid) or
  • Cefotetan (e.g., Cefotan) or
  • Divalproex (e.g., Depakote) or
  • Heparin or
  • Inflammation or pain medicine, except narcotics, or
  • Pentoxifylline (e.g., Trental) or
  • Plicamycin (e.g., Mithracin) or
  • Sulfinpyrazone (e.g., Anturane) or
  • Ticarcillin (e.g., Ticar) or
  • Ticlopidine (e.g., Ticlid) or
  • Valproic acid (e.g., Depakene)-The chance of bleeding may be increased

Other medical problems- The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of dipyridamole. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:
  • Chest pain-The chance of side effects may be increased
  • Low blood pressure-Large amounts of dipyridamole can make your condition worse


Proper Use of This Medicine

This medicine works best when there is a constant amount in the blood. To help keep the amount constant, dipyridamole must be taken in regularly spaced doses , as ordered by your doctor.

This medicine works best when taken with a full glass (8 ounces) of water at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after meals. However, to lessen stomach upset, your doctor may want you to take the medicine with food or milk.

Dosing-

The dose of dipyridamole will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label . The following information includes only the average doses of dipyridamole. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

  • For preventing blood clots:
    • For oral dosage form (tablets):
      • Adults-The usual dose is 75 to 100 milligrams (mg) four times a day taken together with an anticoagulant (blood-thinning) medicine.
      • Children-Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed dose-

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possble. However, if it is within 4 hours of your next scheduled dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage-

To store this medicine:

  • Keep out of the reach of children.
  • Store away from heat and direct light.
  • Do not store in the bathroom, near the kitchen sink, or in other damp places. Heat or moisture may cause the medicine to break down.
  • Do not keep outdated medicine or medicine no longer needed. Be sure that any discarded medicine is out of the reach of children.


Precautions While Using This Medicine

Dipyridamole is sometimes used together with an anticoagulant (blood thinner) or aspirin. The combination of medicines may provide better protection against the formation of blood clots than any of the medicines used alone. However, the risk of bleeding may also be increased when dipyridamole is taken with aspirin. To reduce the risk of bleeding:

  • Do not take aspirin, or any combination medicine containing aspirin, unless the same doctor who directed you to take dipyridamole also directs you to take aspirin . This is especially important if you are taking an anticoagulant together with dipyridamole.
  • If you have been directed to take aspirin together with dipyridamole, take only the amount of aspirin ordered by your doctor . If you need a medicine to relieve pain or a fever, your doctor may not want you to take extra aspirin. It is a good idea to discuss this with your doctor, so that you will know ahead of time what medicine to take.
  • Your doctor should check your progress at regular visits.

Tell all medical doctors and dentists you go to that you are taking dipyridamole, and whether or not you are taking an anticoagulant (blood thinner) or aspirin together with it .

Dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting may occur , especially when you get up from a lying or sitting position. Getting up slowly may help. If this problem continues or gets worse, check with your doctor.


Side Effects of This Medicine

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur shortly after you start taking this medicine:

  • Rare
    • Chest pain;  gallstones;  tightness or swelling of neck;  yellow eyes or skin 

Other side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. However, check with your doctor if they continue or are bothersome:

  • More common
    • Abdominal or stomach cramps;  diarrhea ;  dizziness or lightheadedness 

  • Less common
    • Flushing;  headache;  nausea or vomiting;  weakness 

  • Rare
    • General discomfort and/or unusual tiredness or weakness;  hair loss;  joint pain or swelling;  muscle pain;  runny nose;  sneezing 

Other side effects not listed above may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your doctor.



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Last updated: Tue, 06 Jan 2009 00:20:03 GMT
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