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Other drug names: A-Am An-Az B C-Ch Ci-Cz D-Dh Di-Dz E F G H I-J K-L M-Mh Mi-Mz N-Nh Ni-Nz O P-Pl Pm-Pz Q-R S-Sn So-Sz T-To Tp-Tz U-V W-Z 0-9   

Danazol

IMPORTANT WARNING:

Do not take danazol if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. A method of birth control (contraception) other than oral contraceptives should be used while taking danazol. If you become pregnant, call your doctor immediately. Life-threatening strokes, increased pressure in the brain, and serious liver disease complicated by potentially life-threatening abdominal bleeding have been reported during therapy with danazol. Talk to your doctor about the potential risks associated with this medication.

Why is this medication prescribed?

Danazol is used to treat endometriosis, a disease that causes infertility, pain before and during menstrual periods, pain during and after sexual activity, and heavy or irregular bleeding. Danazol also is used in fibrocystic breast disease to reduce breast pain, tenderness, and nodules (lumps). Danazol also is used to prevent attacks of angioedema in both males and females.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How should this medicine be used?

Danazol comes as a capsule to take by mouth. It usually is taken twice a day. Women should take the first dose during a menstrual period and take it continuously thereafter. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take danazol exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Do not stop taking danazol without talking to your doctor. If you have fibrocystic breast disease, breast pain and tenderness usually improve during the first month that you take danazol and go away in 2-3 months; nodules should improve in 4-6 months.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking danzaol,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to danazol or any other drugs.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin); diabetes medications such as insulin; medications to prevent seizures, especially carbamazepine (Tegretol); and vitamins.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had migraine headaches; heart, liver, or kidney disease; seizures (epilepsy); or a history of stroke, blood clots, or breast cancer.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Although side effects from danazol are not common, they can occur. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • acne
  • decrease in breast size
  • deepening of the voice, hoarseness, or sore throat
  • weight gain
  • swelling (water retention and bloating)
  • oily skin or hair
  • hair growth in unusual amounts and places
  • flushing
  • sweating
  • vaginal dryness, burning, itching, or bleeding
  • nervousness
  • depression
  • irritability
  • absence of menstrual cycle, spotting, or change in menstrual cycle

If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • skin rash
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • persistent headache
  • persistent upset stomach
  • vomiting
  • visual disturbances
  • persistent abdominal pain
  • for males, frequent, prolonged, or painful penile erections

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

In case of emergency/overdose

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. You probably will have periodic blood tests; men also may have semen tests. Your doctor may change your dose, depending on your response to the medication.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

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Last updated: Tue, 06 Jan 2009 00:20:03 GMT
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