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Enoxaparin Sodium Injection (Home Infusion)

IMPORTANT WARNING:

If you have epidural or spinal anesthesia or a spinal puncture while taking a 'blood thinner' such as enoxaparin, you are at risk for internal bleeding that could cause you to become paralyzed. Tell your doctor if you are taking abciximab (ReoPro); anagrelide (Agrylin); other anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin); aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, or Nuprin), indomethacin (Indocin), ketoprofen (Actron, Orudis), naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprosyn), or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); cilostazol (Pletal); clopidogrel (Plavix); dipyridamole (Persantine); eptifibatide (Integrilin); sulfinpyrazone (Anturane); ticlopidine (Ticlid); and tirofiban (Aggrastat) . If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately: numbness, tingling, leg weakness or paralysis, and loss of control over your bladder or bowels. Talk to your doctor about the risk of taking enoxaparin.

About your treatment

Your doctor has ordered enoxaparin, an anticoagulant ''blood thinner'', to prevent harmful blood clots from forming. It is often prescribed for patients after hip or knee replacement surgery. It works by stopping the formation of substances that cause clots. The drug will be injected under the skin (subcutaneously) one or two times daily. This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Your health care provider (doctor, nurse, or pharmacist) may measure the effectiveness and side effects of your treatment using laboratory tests and physical examinations. It is important to keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. The length of treatment depends on how you respond to the medication.

Precautions

Before administering enoxaparin,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to enoxaparin, heparin, any other drugs, or pork products.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially those listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section and vitamins.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease, an infection in your heart, a recent stroke, a bleeding disorder, ulcers, or a low platelet count.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking enoxaparin, call your doctor.

Administering your medication

Enoxaparin comes as an injection in a syringe. Before you administer enoxaparin, look at the solution closely. It should be clear and free of floating material. Observe the syringe to make sure there are no leaks. Do not use the solution if it is discolored, if it contains particles, or if it leaks. Use a new syringe, but show the damaged one to your health care provider.

It is important that you use your medication exactly as directed. Do not change your dosing schedule without talking to your health care provider.

Enoxaparin is to be injected just under the skin (subcutaneously) but not into your muscle. Your health care provider will teach you how to give yourself the shot or arrangements will be made for someone else to give you the shot. Enoxaparin usually is injected in the stomach area. You must use a different area of the stomach each time you give the shot. If you have questions about where to give the shot, ask your health care provider. Each syringe has enough drug for one shot. Do not use the syringe and needle more than one time.

To inject enoxaparin, follow these steps:

  • Wash your hands and the area of skin where you will give the shot.
  • Look at the syringe to be sure the drug is clear and colorless or pale yellow.
  • Take the cap off the needle. Do not push any air or drug out of the syringe before giving the shot unless your health care provider tells you to.
  • Lie down and pinch a fold of skin between your finger and thumb. Push the entire needle into the skin and then press down on the syringe plunger to inject the drug. Hold onto the skin the entire time you give the shot. Do not rub the site after you give the shot.

Side effects

Although side effects from enoxaparin are not common, they can occur. Tell your health care provider if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • upset stomach
  • fever
  • irritation or burning at the site of injection

If you experience any of the following symptoms or those listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, call your health care provider immediately:

  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • black or bloody stools
  • blood in urine
  • swollen ankles or feet

Storing your medication

  • Your health care provider probably will give you a several-day supply of enoxaparin at a time. You will be told to store it at room temperature.

Store your medication only as directed. Make sure you understand what you need to store your medication properly.

Keep your supplies in a clean, dry place when you are not using them, and keep all medications and supplies out of reach of children. Your health care provider will tell you how to throw away used needles, syringes, tubing, and containers to avoid accidental injury.

In case of emergency/overdose

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

Signs of infection

If you are receiving enoxaparin under your skin, you need to know the symptoms of a catheter-related infection (an infection where the needle enters your skin). If you experience any of these effects near the infusion site, tell your health care provider as soon as possible:

  • tenderness
  • warmth
  • irritation
  • drainage
  • redness
  • swelling
  • pain

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Last updated: Tue, 06 Jan 2009 00:20:03 GMT
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